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Tuesday, January 06, 2009

SEABIRD, by Sherry Thompson



Tuesday: Choices. As with Cara we are all given choices, even if God has called us to do something. Even then He gives us the choice to accept or refuse that calling. Once you accept this truth there is no easy road set before you. All roads are dfficult and to refuse your calling is hazardous. Cara finds this to be true. Her journey is marked by many tears, tears that she sheds because of choices she makes. Then tears because of those she has come to love coming to harm. Tears well up within her over the enormity of the task set before her, but a sweet whisper deep within her tells her, "Lisen and watch". For God does not call us to do something that He is unable to accomplish through us. The problem is that we have such a difficult time in giving the situation over to Him. I was once told that God cannot make a person willing, but He can make them willing to be willing. You find that in SEABIRD. If you are in a cabin that is on fire and refuse to get out to safety, God can and will throw a hornet's nest in that cabin (because of His great love for you) so that you will flee the burning flames of the cabins in your life. So choosing to follow Him earlier on is much more preferable, although not always easy. Still, you will find that some tears you shed will be tears of joy, and these are the kind of tears His children should shed.

We're at it again. That's right, "Tag, you're it". Those posting reviews are listed below, although in no special order. Plus, there are other team members who will be posting just the basics, which I'm sure you'll find intriguing as well. So hunt around and enjoy the journey. Like Cara you may not think you are special or anything, but you really are. You may find yourself on one of these sites.






Now a little about Sherry Thompson:

I was born in Baltimore MD in 1946. Between then and my fifth year, my family moved to New-Port-News VA, Homeville PA and finally to Marshallton, Wilmington DE. I've lived somewhere in New Castle County DE ever since.

I attended the University of Delaware and received a BAAS cum laude from their School of Education in 1969. My major was Interdepartmental History but I earned sufficient credits to secure unofficial minors in both English and Educational Psychology.

During the last three years of my time as an undergraduate, I also worked about 20 hours a week at the University of Delaware Library. I was accepted into the university's psychology graduate program, but chose to accept a fulltime position at the UD library instead.

I worked at the library from the spring of 1965 to the spring of 2000, when I retired from my position as Supervisor of the Interlibrary Loan unit within Access Services. Now, I write. And, revise, and volunteer, and … oh, yes, I write.


Now for further information and where to buy this wonderful book you can go to the source itself,


Visit Sherry's Scribblings

her Author Profile at Red Room,

and her Home Page.

Purchase Seabird at Books a Million, Barnes and Noble or Amazon.



2 comments:

UtM, SherryT said...

Sometimes it's difficult to make a choice because we seem to have one or more options and not enough "data" to go on when it comes to which of them to choose. I depict my main character, Cara, in that kind of a dilemma early in the first chapter, where she is debating making a purchase.

In other cases, we know which action we should choose to take but selfish concerns get in the way. Cara goes through a period like this -- also early in "Seabird".

At other times, we are faced with following through with a choice that we have tacitly already made in our hearts. Has the choice actually been made until we act on it? That's not up to me to say.

However, Cara, goes through this situation several times. She knows what she needs to do but she's afraid that she isn't up to doing it -- that she lacks the knowledge, the physical strength, the courage, etc.

What Cara forgets -- and what we often need to remember ourselves -- is that we are never given a burden or a task to do that is beyond our abilities. Why? Because we will always have Outside Help. Or maybe, Inside Help.

In the first half of the book, Cara views herself as being utterly alone and facing a force far beyond her own abilities. And she's right, based on her flawed view of reality. Later, she comes to realize that she isn't alone at all, and that absolutely no one -- except herself -- ever expected her to act alone. One acquaintance Cara makes actually has to remind her of this fact on several occasions before it sinks in. Mark of a good and patient friend.

Scripture is filled with examples of people who balked about taking action even when they knew what the right course of action was. Moses was concerned that he would not be able to speak fluently on behalf of his people. Gideon hid.

I wonder about David sometimes. There he is getting prepared to fight Goliath, something that he knows it is his to do. What was he thinking when he had almost finished putting on Saul's armor and realized that it was so heavy he could barely move in it? I know what I would be thinking. That the bulk of the armor itself and my own lack of strength to make use of it fairly cried out that the role I was about to take on was just plain too big to be accomplished by me. David might have reflected on the fact that he was anointed as a king when he was young, yet he wasn't the king. That the current king, Saul, wasn't going to go out and fight a death match for the fate of their people. Instead, he -- a mere shepherd -- was. As Cara thought under similar circumstances, "What's wrong with this picture?"

David took off the armor, determining that he didn't need it. He realized that he had Other Help.

So does Cara in my story. It just takes her a while before she catches on to this fact and then learns to trust in it.

SherryT
http://khivasmommy.googlepages.com/authorintro
http://tree-lady.livejournal.com/#asset-tree_lady-68618

David said...

This is one of the compelling aspects of SEABIRD. We get to watch Cara mature spiritually as the story moves along. It gives me hope about myself, that when called upon, I will also go through these same "changes", but if obedient I will mature so that He can work through me. Already I see this being played out in my life. There is that, "Hey wait a minute. You got the wrong guy." After which it is followed by, "Are you sure you have the right person. I can't do this." Then I'm moving into, "OK God. Whatever you want, but I can't do it so you're going to have to do it." These are steps of maturity and it is refreshing to see this portrayed in Cara's life. I'm getting tired of Christian novels where the Christian has all the answers and is up to any challenge that comes his or her way. That's just not realistic, SEABIRD, however, is.

David Brollier

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